Feminist Scholarship

Mission:

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Feminist Scholarship is interested in exploring the relationship of gender and communication, both mediated and non-mediated, within a context of feminist theories, methodologies, and practices.

The Division explores issues such as feminist teaching; international commonalities and differences by race, class and gender; women's alternative media; and feminist cultural studies. Members support and encourage feminist scholarship in other divisions, and work with the Committee on the Status of Women to link scholarship to issues concerning women professionals.

Announcements:

Call for Papers

An Intergenerational Feminist Media Studies: Conflicts and Connectives
A special anniversary issue of Feminist Media Studies
Edited by Jessalynn Keller, Jo Littler and Alison Winch

 

This special 15th anniversary issue of Feminist Media Studies will explore the interconnections between different generations of women and girls in the contemporary media landscape, building upon several successful roundtables we convened around this topic in London in autumn 2014.

While feminism has become increasingly visible within western popular media cultures over the past few years, little scholarly attention has been paid to the ways in which age and generation shape mediated conversations about feminist politics globally. This collection will address this oversight, aiming to problematize dominant media representations of intergenerational “catfights” and feminist “bickering,” while simultaneously interrogating the ways in which mediated conflicts and connectivities shape the potential to work together to enact feminist social change.

We ask: What kind of shared conversations do women have across age groups and how do these circulate in media cultures in various global contexts? How can intergenerational alliances be built while still remaining sensitive to differences of experience? How are feminist connections being formed via digital media technologies and platforms?

How do new forms of mediated activism over sexual violence, queerness, racism, and social reproduction relate to those of their predecessors?

How is feminist conflict mediated and how might it operate productively?

How do particular issues such as “sexualisation” become indicative of intergenerational conflict?

Considering these questions in relation to the growth of feminist media studies over the past fifteen years, this issue will simultaneously foreground how feminist media studies can contribute, and how it has contributed, to an understanding of such intergenerationality. How do different generations of feminist media scholars talk to each other?

What impediments arise in these conversations? How do geographical and cultural locations impact these conversations? How do we theorize these generational divides and dialogues? Does an effective intergenerational feminist media studies exist, or do we need to invent or extend it?

Possible paper themes might include, but are not restricted to:

· the mediation of age and ageing

· feminist alliances within austerity and neoliberalism

· feminist ‘waves’ in transnational contexts

· intergenerational activism challenging global power inequalities

· the mediation of feminist conflict and crisis

· intersections of ‘race’, class, sexuality and generation

· generational politics within digital media cultures and practices

· queering feminist media studies

· the legacies of feminist anti-racism

· boys and men as feminist allies

· feminist girls

Please send 400-600 word abstracts and a 100-word bio by 15th February 2015 to Jessalynn Keller (j.keller@mdx.ac.uk), Alison Winch (alisonwinch@gmail.com) and Jo Littler (jo.littler.1@city.ac.uk).

Final papers will be no more than 8,000 words and will be due 1st September 2015. Information about Feminist Media Studies can be found here:  http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rfms20/current#.VGIbEYdJM7A

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Announcing a new book on transnational feminist and media studies out this month.

Diana and Beyond: White femininity, national identity and contemporary media culture
University of Illinois Press, November 2014).   By Raka Shome

Analyzes the global circulation of white femininity.  Examines the relation between white femininity and nation in contemporary media.

Moves from ideas on the positioning of privileged white women in global neoliberalism to the emergence of new formulations of white femininity in the millennium.

http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/54tky7xw9780252038730.html

Advance Praise:

"Brings together one of the most talked about images in recent history, Princess Diana, with one of the least talked about, whiteness. It is a brilliant move, to see, scrutinize and show the elusive, and to many people invisible, structures of white femininity in one of its most visible and vivid manifestations. Combining a painstaking analysis of Diana's immediate historical and cultural context with a wide sense of her connection to other prominent images of white femininity, the book lucidly opens up the gender and ethnic specificities of particular, but also broad and familiar, instances of motherhood, fashion, nation, masculinity, and spirituality. This is a major contribution to cultural history and celebrity studies as well as the fields of gender and whiteness, beautifully written, always enthralling."--Richard Dyer, author of White: Essays on Race and Culture and Heavenly Bodies: Film Stars and Society

"Well-researched and theoretically sophisticated, this work asks disturbing questions of contemporary neoliberal politics. By focusing on the significance of Princess Diana's whiteness, Shome's work takes us beyond post-imperial, postcolonial analyses of whiteness, by engaging instead with neoliberalism and globalization. Moving between the ethos of New Labour's 'Cool Britannia' and the Coalition government's demands for a skewed and cruel austerity, this work re-inflects race, class and sexuality in contemporary culture in new and significant ways. Without a doubt, one of the most significant books to be written about the intertwining of race, class and gender on the one hand and neoliberalism and multiculturalism on the other."--Radhika Mohanram, co-author of Imperialism as Diaspora: Race, Sexuality, and History in Anglo-India

"Diana and Beyond generates astute understandings not only of the culture of the contemporary UK but also of transnationalized regimes of gender, privilege, and social class. Raka Shome has produced a genuinely intellectually exciting book that is adept at analyzing important cultural phenomena too often written off as ephemeral, apolitical and 'feminine.'"--Diane Negra, author of Off-White Hollywood: American Culture and Ethnic Female Stardom

"Shome's book is expertly-written and much-needed, connecting whiteness studies with concerns about neoliberalism and global media cultures."--Catherine R. Squires, author of The Post-Racial Mystique:Media and Race in the Twenty-First Century.


Feminist Reception Studies in a Post-Audience Age: Returning to Audiences and Everyday Life

Andre Cavalcante, University of Virginia,
Andrea Press, University of Virginia,
Katherine Sender, University of Auckland,
Editors

From its inception, the qualitative study of media audiences has been informed by feminist concerns. Pioneering work in the field such as Herzog’s classic study about female listeners of daytime radio soap operas, Hobson’s analysis of the role of television in working class housewives’ daily round, and Radway’s exploration into female readers of romance novels, foregrounded women’s experiences with media, and pushed the boundaries of the social science/humanities divide that existed in media studies. In doing so, they exposed the lived realities of women’s everyday lives, which emerged as a worthy object of academic analysis, transcending existing methodological boundaries in the process.
Since this work, feminist media and communication studies has continued to pioneer analyses of media reception in the context of everyday life. Extending beyond women, the field has offered insight into lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) experiences with media. It has also explored the changing role of sex, gender, and desire, as media have become increasingly portable, social, and integrated into the fabric of commerce, politics, culture, and daily life. In light of rapid and widespread shifts in contemporary communications technologies and the emergence of new media environments, we argue for a reinvestment in scholarship that critically attends to the relationship between media, audiences and everyday life, and that continues to transcend the divide between the social science and humanities in the tradition of earlier feminist audience research.
In this special issue of Feminist Media Studies, we call for abstracts that reflect a commitment to feminist and/or queer audience scholarship in our contemporary media environment, or what some call a “post-audience” age. We seek feminist audience research that interrogates the everyday world, attending to how it is differently experienced by individuals across the gender spectrum. In other words, our goal is to bring together a diverse body of work that deploys a feminist lens to study how our contemporary media culture deploys a feminist lens to study how audiences make media meaningful in the gendered context of everyday life.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
- What the ‘post-audience’ age means for everyday experiences of gender
- The ways LGBTQ individuals use new media in their everyday lives
- Conducting feminist audience research in the ‘post audience’ age
- The significance of media to women at various stages of life
- The gendered dimensions of transnational audiences
- The way gender influences audiences’ practices of reception and reading strategies
- How audiences conceive of feminism
- Media’s role in daily experiences of gender, embodiment, sexuality, and desire
- Experiences of gender and sexual subjectivity in virtual worlds
- The relationship between media, affect, and the body
- Thoughts on audience research methodology in the ‘post audience’ age of new media
- The impact of feminism and postfeminism on audience research methodology

Abstracts should be no more than 750 words and should be sent to all three special issue editors (apress@virginia.edu, amc7jc@virginia.edu and k.sender@auckland.ac.nz) by May 15, 2015. Please give your email the subject head “Abstract for special issue of Feminist Media Studies.” Abstracts should be submitted as a Word document. Please make sure your name and the paper title is on the abstract itself, not only in the email.

If accepted, final papers should be no more than 7,000 words long including bibliography, notes, and so on. Feminist Media Studies uses the Chicago-Author-Date citation style. Please refer to the general instructions for preparation of manuscripts here:
http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rfms20&page=instructions#.U-BUKYCSzew.
Submissions significantly over length or not consistent with the journal style will be returned for editing.

Deadlines:
Abstracts to editors: May 15, 2015
First drafts to editors: January 20, 2016
Second drafts to editors: June 1, 2016
Final revisions to editors: November 1, 2016
Publication: February 2017

Members:

  • Paula M Gardner, Chair
  • Natalia Rybas, Vice-Chair
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